Biden’s Super Tuesday surge reshapes Democratic race, Bloomberg out


WASHINGTON/NEW YORK (Reuters) – The search for a Democrat to challenge Republican U.S. President Donald Trump in the Nov. 3 election narrowed on Wednesday to a choice between Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden, who staged a comeback in voting Super Tuesday to become the undisputed standard-bearer of the party’s moderate wing.

In an unexpectedly strong showing, former Vice President Biden was set to win 10 of the 14 states up for grabs on Tuesday, including the major prize of Texas. He stormed ahead in the overall tally of delegates who will choose a presidential nominee at the Democratic convention in July.


Powered by Reuters

Italy to close all schools, universities amid coronavirus crisis


“None of us can be sure about the future evolution of the disease,” said Angelo Borrelli, head of the Civil Protection Agency.

Italy announced Wednesday it will temporarily close all its schools and universities as the country continues to grapple with a surge in coronavirus infections, according to new reports.

Those closures will begin Thursday and last until mid-March, CNBC reported.

Italian officials also said they may set up a new quarantine area, or “red zone,” in an attempt to contain the outbreak.


Powered by News Corp

Coronavirus patient ignored self-isolation order to go to business event


A hospital worker who became New Hampshire’s first coronavirus patient had been ordered to self-isolate — but went to a college’s business event instead, health officials have revealed. The selfish Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center staffer showed symptoms after returning from a trip to Italy, and was told to stay home while awaiting the test result.


[Complete Article]


Powered by News Corp

Bloomberg: Guns for Me, but Not for Thee

How do you justify pushing for more gun control when you have an armed security detail that is likely equipped with the same firearms and magazines you seek to ban the common citizen from owning? Does your life matter more than mine or my family’s or these people’s?” a Virginian named Clarke Chitty asked Democratic Party presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg during a recent Fox News town hall.

It’s an outstanding question. And Bloomberg’s answer is pretty straightforward: Yes, his life is worth more than yours.

“Look, I probably get 40 or 50 threats every week, OK, and some of them are real. That just happens when you’re the mayor of New York City or you’re very wealthy and if you’re campaigning for president of the United States,” Bloomberg replied. “You get lots of threats. So, I have a security detail, I pay for it all myself, and . . . they’re all retired police officers who are very well trained in firearms.”

In the United States, our rights aren’t — or shouldn’t be — meted out according to status. But you’ll notice Bloomberg doesn’t really answer the question, anyway. I suspect millions of Americans who aren’t as famous or rich (very rich, in this case) live in situations in which their property and safety are threatened to the same extent. Not that it matters. Does Bloomberg propose that everyone undergo a government risk assessment before being allowed to practice constitutional rights?

Probably, right?

More importantly, Clarke Chitty, one suspects, has zero interest in stripping away Bloomberg’s constitutional right to own a firearm, or to hire professional armed bodyguards to protect him from legitimate threats. The former mayor of New York City, on the other hand, has spent hundreds of millions of dollars in efforts to pass laws and regulations that would leave Americans like Clarke Chitty defenseless.

It’s this kind of arrogance that brought about District of Columbia v. Heller, the case affirming that the Second Amendment is an individual right. One of the first plaintiffs in that effort, Shelly Parker, was an African-American resident of Washington, D.C., who had gotten fed up with the crime near her Capitol Hill home. She attempted to rally her neighbors to clean up the neighborhood, provoking the ire of local drug dealers, who began vandalizing her property and threatening her life. “In the event that someone does get in my home,” she explained, “I would have no defense, except maybe throw my paper towels at them.” It would have been illegal for Parker, neither wealthy nor famous, to obtain a gun to protect herself. She was also in danger.


[Complete Article]


Powered by National Review

Corey Feldman says his life is in danger over doc exposing Hollywood abusers


“It’s scary. It’s very scary.”

He arrived at “The Wendy Williams Show” with a security detail on Tuesday and “said his life has been threatened since working on his doc,” a source told.

“My Truth: The Rape of 2 Coreys” covers the experiences of him and his best friend, the late Corey Haim. “We had both been molested as children … He was raped physically. I was raped emotionally. I was molested,” he told Williams. Feldman has never named his or Haim’s abusers, but promises to expose them in the doc.

“I am saying every name that affected … our lives, and we have victims talking about their experiences … The one main name that everyone is waiting to hear … It is a name that everybody on the planet knows.”


Powered by News Corp